Tag: dog

TASP Fantasy Photo Backgrounds – July, 2020


#1 Campin’ Out


#2 Patriotic Stars


#3 Beach Bag


#4 Stars & Stripes


#5 Water’s Edge


#6 Love on the Beach


#7 I Love Rock n Roll


#8 Down on the Farm


#9 Mexican Frame


#10 Sunny Morning


#11 Festive Blanket


#12 Picnic Table


#13 Staycation


#14 Misty Green


#15 Celebrate the USA


#16 Rainbow Fence


#17 Beach Blanket


#18 Summertime


#19 Sun & Sand


#20 Summer Banner



TASP Fantasy Photo Backgrounds – June, 2020

Father’s Day, Graduation, Summer Fun and More….


#1 Celebrate Safely With You


#2 Father Knows Best


#3 Father’s Day 2020


#4 Old Glory


#5 Egad!


#6 Greetings From NY


#7 Front End Loader


#8 I Heart Dad


#9 Number 1 Gear-Head


#10 Abstract


#11 Swingin’


#12 Stable Mate


#13 Let’s Put the Top Down


#14 Hog


#15 Staycation


#16 A Walk in the Forest


#17 Up, up and Away!


#18 Rock My World


#19 Let’s Stay Home


#20 Baseball Season


#21 Love You



Life in the Sci-Fi Movie

Thanks for clicking on this, our 6th issue of the TASP e-newsletter. We’re a little late getting this out to you for myriad reasons all relating to juggling volunteer activities amid jobs, families, aging pets and “The Invisible Enemy.” At this writing, Rich and I are in pseudo-isolation here on the farm, observing social distancing as much as is practical. The business I work for is considered essential so it’s off to work I go each weekday, with my mask dangling from my rearview mirror, ready to be donned at the least sign of an approaching human.

I count my blessings daily about my own health and the location of our home that is 20 minutes from civilization in any direction. Being farmers for so many years, we became accustomed long ago to stockpiling two weeks’ worth of groceries meds and staples in our basement; that’s what country people do. And having the privilege of just being able to let the dogs out into a safe, secure yard where we don’t have to worry about sharing a 6-foot radius with a stranger while leash walking is something we can’t possibly take for granted. Our hearts go out to all the folks with pets in the cities who have to share elevators and sidewalks to exercise their best friends. We know this piles stress upon stress right now.

Speaking of stress-upon-stress, I’ve been observing animals (my own and those of local owners in need) as they go to the vet clinics and hospitals these days and I recognize this is not an ideal situation for anyone concerned: pet/vet/guardian. For those of you who haven’t yet had to avail yourselves of a visit to the vet since February, here’s how social distancing at the vet’s office goes: you drive up to the building, text or call the vet front desk to announce your arrival, and then a gloved, gowned, masked vet tech comes out to take your pet from you. They carry or leash-walk the pet inside while you sit in your car and await a call from the vet who discusses diagnosis and treatment with you. Then you wait some more while that work is done, and then another call from the front desk to collect the fee via credit card over the phone. At last, the vet tech brings your freaked out pet back to your car and you drive them home, hoping that the pet will forgive you for what you just put them through.

It’s all necessary. But so many things can go sour throughout a process like this, it’s hard to list them all here. There’s the possibility of the pet falling or getting loose from its leash/collar during the walk to and from the vet’s building. There’s the possibility that the gowned, masked, gloved vet will misread the pet’s symptoms because that pet hadn’t previously ever seen a human dressed like this (usually they’re already under anesthesia by the time the prepped surgeon shows up) and is reacting with such stress that temperature, pulse and respiration, the benchmarks of all vet visits, aren’t even close to what they are back home. Even blood levels change in the presence of severe stress. And then there’s the possibility that the pet may be so stressed by this kind of management that they don’t trust you anymore when you offer the opportunity to go for a ride. Don’t think these things can happen? They are ALL things that have already happened to me and to pets I brought to various vets since the COVID-19 sci-fi movie started. Not every time, but enough that I think it’s important to mention it and suggest a way to make things a little easier on everyone.

So for starters, I suggest that as pet owners, we should all be working to desensitize our pets to the approach of a masked person. Hand the pet a treat, pull out the mask and let them smell it. Hand them another treat. Put the mask on and treat. Take the mask off and treat. Repeat, repeat, repeat. If you have different kinds of masks, do this with all of them. Then do it in different places…in the bedroom, in the car, outdoors, and so on. Keep associating your pet’s favorite things with the mask, gradually working up to the point where you can wear the mask in their presence without them emptying their bladder/colon and without them fleeing when you reach out to pick them up.

Social distancing mandates have impacted the way TASP does things, too. Our RPI volunteers have all had to leave the school indefinitely so we miss those young, enthusiastic faces and strong backs more than I can say. We had to shut down our monthly photo clinics that we always looked forward to as much as our supporters did. After about 10 years of these clinics, I personally had lost touch with the concept of being at home on a weekend instead of sitting at the computer at Benson’s or Pet Supplies Plus. In the tradition of improvisation, which is one of the things TASP prides ourselves in, we moved those clinics to the internet and are now emailing and mailing out photos to folks, instead of creating our art on the scene. So far so good with this approach, although it’s going to take some time to ramp up business. We are still hoping that once COVID-19 has become better understood, there will be a way for us to return with our computers, lights and cameras to the real world where people can see each other in person instead of on Zoom. Until then, take a look at the online photo clinics posted on our website and please consider sending us your orders and your comments and suggestions on how we can make the experience even better: http://www.theanimalsupportproject.com/tasp-fantasy-photos-the-fun-continues-online/

TASP also had to implement a new plan for meeting the needs of animals in our community. We used to visit homes as standard procedure for delivering supplies, investigating pet-owner’s needs and doing things like grooming, nail trims and first aid. Now, to protect our volunteers and the pet owners who need our help, we can’t go into homes, at least for now. We’re meeting up with people in parking lots and at the curb to drop off pet food and flea collars, shipping products via mail and UPS, and scoping out situations over our smartphone cameras. This approach is not what we like to do; being with animals and the people who love them is why we do what we do. But if anyone understands the value of safety, it’s The Animal Support Project. For now, this is the best way we can think of to keep supporting animals and their owners, especially through THIS tough time.

One of the most difficult things for me to say to all of you is, in 2020, thanks to COVID-19, TASP will probably not be able to meet or exceed the number of animals served last year. While we have the funds available, we are still helping qualified low-income folks with vet expenses. But with so many of our local fund raisers (photo clinics, tag sales, adoption clinics…..) being postponed or outright cancelled, TASP won’t see the same level of donations this year. Our first quarter financial review illustrated that very clearly and painfully to us. So we’re doing our best to stretch every dollar spent while still delivering the highest possible level of service to the local animals in our community. We’re making every effort to seek grants wherever we can find them to help fund the programs we already have established but alas, there are more grants available for shelters and rescues with paid staff than for all-volunteer outfits like ours who are keeping pets OUT of the shelters.

One program that we feel very strongly about is the Paws2Protect program. Through Paws2Protect, we provide free Seresto flea & tick collars to low income pet owners. We’re convinced this approach is the cheapest way for TASP to help animals and their owners avoid the costly consequences of flea and tick issues. Don’t get me wrong, these collars aren’t cheap by any means. But the cost of a Seresto collar is a whole lot less than the cost of a vet visit and treatment for things like Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, tapeworm or flea dermatitis. So with each collar we distribute, TASP saves approximately $150-$600, depending on the size and number of pets in the home. TASP just placed our order for 90 more of these collars for cats and dogs; so if you know someone in the Capital Region who earns under $30,000 annually and who needs a Seresto collar, please feel welcome to put them in touch with us. And if you know someone who wants to help sponsor this important work, please send them our way.

Personally, I’m looking forward to a time when COVID-19 is not turning everyone’s world inside-out. I’m fortunate to have a job and a home that is isolated by definition. But not everyone in my family can say this and I miss them as much as I’m sure y’all miss your friends and families. I thank God we have our pets to help us keep things in perspective, to remind us to live for the moment and to not let our worries get the best of us. Everyone at TASP is committed to keeping pets and people together in every way possible, using every tool we have available, even if a virus changes the way we do it. And if it takes setting up a kennel in a parking lot to hand out Seresto collars at a low income apartment complex and groom dogs outdoors then that’s what we’ll do. I just hope the animals aren’t too freaked out by my mask.


TASP Fantasy Photos: The Fun Continues ONLINE!

Life just keeps getting stranger and stranger, but one thing can still be counted on: TASP continues to keep the Fantasy Photo Fun flowing indefinitely!  Until we can all get together in person, The Animal Support Project’s Fantasy Photo clinics are being updated monthly ONLINE!  Now you can order your TASP Fantasy Photos ONLINE each month, at your convenience, in the comfort of your own foxhole……and know you’re continuing to help our community’s pets stay safe and healthy while you stay safe and healthy, too!

It’s easy to get a TASP Fantasy Photo emailed directly to your inbox and/or a print mailed to your home.  Just send us an email at taspinfo@yahoo.com that includes the following:

Choose your background(s). CLICK HERE TO SEE THE BACKGROUNDS.

Attach your own photo of your subject(s) taken against a plain background.  If you have multiple subjects and want them to appear in the same photo, just send us a photo of each subject separately and we’ll combine them digitally.  Already been to a TASP photo clinic in the past? We can look up previous photos of your subject(s) from our archives and use them to create this month’s photo.

Let us know how you’d like to receive your photo:

Emailed .jpg photo @ $10 donation

Mailed hard copy print @ $10 donation (Be sure to supply your mailing address).

Or get both for $15 donation!

Lucite® frame for mailed photos optional @ additional $5 (covers cost of frame and mailing)

*Please be sure your email includes a phone number where you can be reached in case we need to contact you.

TASP volunteers will create your special photo and email you an invoice when it’s ready.  Payment can be made through Paypal, or you can just mail TASP a check.  Finished photos will be sent out within 24 hours of payment received.

With so many challenges brought about by COVID-19 and local losses from rioting, more companion animals than ever need TASP’s help to stay safe and healthy.  Bringing our friends and supporters this popular activity ONLINE at this time is our way of continuing to finance our mission, while hopefully creating some much-needed smiles.  As always, all proceeds are spent on supporting our community’s most vulnerable companion animals. Thanks for caring!


TASP Fantasy Photo Backgrounds

May, 2020 “Mother’s Day, Memorial Day and More….”


#1 Lilac Lane


#2 Forsythias


#3 Happy Mother’s Day


#4 American Flag


#5 Keep Calm


#6 Patriotic Cupcakes


#7 Sunrise on the Farm


#8 Best Mom


#9 Memorial Day


#10 Flower Power


#11 Crocus Patch


#12 Luv U


#13 TP Mystery Solved


#14 Tulip Portrait


#15 Love on the Beach


#16 Heart of Flowers


#17 Quarantine with my Dog


#18 Seascape


#19 Stars & Stripes


#20 Spring is Sprung



WHAT THE HECK IS THAT?

Well, since our last issue talked about poop, for this issue, we thought we’d supplement that knowledge by exploring the topic of (ugh!) worms and other parasites. Yep, those gross little things that seem to grow for no apparent reason inside and outside of our pets can cause all sorts of complications. If you didn’t care about your pets, chances are you wouldn’t be reading this newsletter, so we want to make sure you have a full kit of information on pet parasites. It will help you better understand where they come from, what trouble they can cause if left untreated, and what the most common treatments are these days.

First of all, nasties like worms, giardia and fleas do NOT grow for no apparent reason. They grow because they were transferred to a host and that new host has a favorable environment in which to set up camp. Didn’t know your pet was so hospitable, did you? And depending on the type of parasite, the transmission and preferred environment can vary; so can the life cycle. There are lots of good articles out there that are written to explain this in detail. We’ll list links to some of our favorites here.

Please bear in mind some of these authors work for companies that sell parasite treatments. TASP isn’t endorsing any particular one and we aren’t suggesting that you necessarily deworm on a monthly basis as some of these articles recommend. Discuss the type and frequency of treatment with your vet; based on your pet’s age, condition and lifestyle, the vet will know how often and what kind of treatment should be administered.

Here goes……

The gold standard for reliable information about just about any condition in animals, including all forms of parasites is the VIN:

VIN

VCA Hospitals published two very straightforward articles about potential transmission of disease (some from parasites) between pets and their families:

VCA Hospitals – Zoonotics in Cats

VCA Hospitals – Zoonotics in Dogs

Perhaps the most comprehensive of all websites dedicated purely to parasites in our pets is (imaginatively called) Pets & Parasites:

Pets & Parasites website

Little City Dogs sells reasonably priced dewormers, flea prevention and heartworm prevention. They also have some really cute blogs about some of the different kinds of worms:

Little City Dogs’ Blog on Heartworm

Little City Dogs’ Blog on Roundworm & Tapeworm

Little City Dogs’ Blog on Tapeworm

Parasites may not be a pretty topic but arming ourselves with good information about them can make a real difference in the quality of life we and our pets can share. So let’s all become parasite warriors for our pets so they and we can live together in harmony .


TASP Joins ASPCA and Other Partners Caring for Hurricane Sandy’s Displaced Pets


ASPCA Funds Construction of Canine Training Yard for The Animal Support Project

RPI’s Acacia Fraternity Joins TASP on Project Funded by ASPCA

Training Yard build

Students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Acacia Fraternity provided the manpower this month, helping The Animal Support Project (TASP) erect a secure 2,000 square foot outdoor canine training yard. The yard, constructed primarily from welded steel kennel panels obtained through a grant from The American Society for The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), will be used for humanely treating behavior in TASP program dogs through positive training and controlled behavior modification methods.

According to TASP President, Melinda Plasse, “TASP’s experience with companion animal crisis intervention indicates that problem behavior is a huge contributor to canine surrenders and euthanasia. We don’t expect to create lambs out of lions here, but of those who do have the potential, we intend to create clearer-thinking, more manageable pets who will have developed the emotional skills to live successful lives in the community. We are thrilled to have the Acacia Brothers onboard for this project, and we look forward to their further involvement during the actual operation of the yard.”

The ASPCA grant was awarded as part of a continuing commitment to Brooke, a dog rescued by TASP from ASPCA’s Hurricane Sandy Temporary Emergency Boarding Facility in Brooklyn, NY. In addition to Brooke, the training yard will offer a legacy of support to TASP program dogs needing behavioral adjustment in order to adapt to home and family life. ASPCA Behaviorists and Crawmer’s Animal Training of West Sand Lake, NY, will provide guidance to TASP volunteers operating the yard program.

For the full Press Release, please visit…   http://www.theanimalsupportproject.com/?p=662

ASPCA Grant Logo


TASP Fantasy Photos, NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE!

Jonesing for your monthly TASP Fantasy Photo clinic?  Wish you could have gotten that special photo of your best friend on one of our fabulous Easter/Springtime theme photo backgrounds BEFORE quarantine?  Well, thanks to the wonders of technology, TASP has found a way to keep the Fantasy Photo Fun flowing!  Starting this month and continuing until COVID-19 lets us all get back on the circuit, The Animal Support Project’s Fantasy Photo clinics are going ONLINE!  Now you can order your TASP Easter/Spring photo ONLINE and know you’re continuing to help our community’s pets stay safe and healthy!  

It’s easy to get a TASP Fantasy Photo emailed directly to your inbox and/or a print mailed to your home.  Just send us an email at taspinfo@yahoo.com that includes the following

Choose your background(s). CLICK HERE TO SEE THE BACKGROUNDS.

Attach your own photo of your subject(s) taken against a plain background.  If you have multiple subjects and want them to appear in the same photo, just send us a photo of each subject separately and we’ll combine them digitally.  Already been to a TASP photo clinic in the past? We can look up previous photos of your subject(s) from our archives and use them to create this month’s photo.

Let us know how you’d like to receive your photo:

Emailed .jpg photo @ $10 donation

Mailed hard copy print @ $10 donation (Be sure to supply your mailing address).

Or get both for $15 donation!

Lucite® frame for mailed photos optional @ additional $3 (covers cost of frame and mailing)

*Please be sure your email includes a phone number where you can be reached in case we need to contact you.

TASP volunteers will create your special photo and email you an invoice when it’s ready.  Payment can be made through Paypal, Venmo or Facebook Pay.  Finished photos will be sent out within 24 hours of payment received.

With so many challenges brought about by COVID-19, more companion animals than ever are going to need TASP’s help to stay safe and healthy.  Bringing our friends and supporters this popular activity ONLINE at this time is our way of continuing to finance our mission, while hopefully creating some much-needed smiles.  As always, all proceeds are spent on supporting our community’s most vulnerable companion animals. Thanks for caring!


COVID-19 and The Animal Support Project

Right now, many folks are reading this message while still in isolation or quarantine or curfew. You may be wondering how The Animal Support Project will be dealing with the changes in all of our lives brought about by the arrival of the Novel Corona Virus and the Random Acts of Crime occurring here in the Capital region and throughout the state. Like everyone else, TASP faces some challenges ahead. We face a loss of revenue from having to temporarily call off our popular Fantasy Pet Photo fund raisers and our tag sales. Add to this an already-evidenced reduction in donations due to the financial stresses many of our supporters are facing after the State imposed mandatory shutdown of so many businesses in NY and then “vampires” decided to destroy what was left of local businesses. These are realities we can’t get around.

That being said, TASP is morphing to adapt as well as we can to continue offering the most support we can muster with available resources. For now, all personal visits to homes have been postponed. We’ve also had to curtail our activities in the local cities after dark due to curfew and the potential risk to our volunteers.  That means no adoption home visits, no visits inside the homes of ailing pets. This is the way it has to be in order to reduce risk of infection or injury to our volunteers and our community. By coincidence, our list of adoptable pets is very small right now and their continued care at their foster homes is perfectly alright until the situation eases. And just because we can’t enter a pet’s home doesn’t mean we can’t help pets who need us. As long as our budget allows, we will utilize all available technologies like video, photos, messaging and facetime to confirm financial need and explore the situations of individual pets so they can be directed to whatever proper professional care we can afford. We can also use video and photos to demonstrate and instruct on preventive care practices to help our community’s pet guardians do the best they can for their best friends.

Our ability to pay for professional veterinary procedures at this time is very much in flux with funds temporarily dried up, but TASP is actively seeking grants for worthy purposes like veterinary care and continuation of our Paws2Protect program that provides free Seresto flea & tick collars to financially needy dogs and cats. We also have expanded our pet food pantry stocking program to serve TEN food pantries across Albany, Rensselaer, Washington and Bennington counties. The Paws2Protect and Hoss Fund programs continue to serve as long as resources remain available and if one of our already-submitted grants is awarded to TASP, we will introduce yet another great program to our toolkit, The Vintage Club: offering vital veterinary services specifically for senior pets.

We’ve even found a way we can still run our Fantasy Photo EASTER CLINICS completely online, with an option for a mailed hard copy photo. So if you’d like an Easter/Spring theme photo of your best friend, just scroll down and click for the lowdown on how to make it happen. We’ve posted details of this new fund raising scheme with sample backgrounds right here on the TASP website, taking orders online and accepting payment through Paypal or by check. Depending on how the reopening of NY State proceeds, we may be holiding our photo clinics online for a few more months so stay tuned!

COVID-19 is an unprecedented pandemic situation that virtually every American jurisdiction knew would occur someday. Even so, it would have been financial and logistical folly for any nation to stockpile the number of devices and supplies needed for this scale of a disaster for the 102 years since the last great epidemic, the Spanish Influenza of 1918. The incident command system shared by local, state and federal agencies as well as 1st responders, businesses, nonprofits and institutions across our nation is the modular, scalable method for efficiently and accountably answering the challenges ahead that COVID presents. TASP will do our best to add our compassion, skills, experience and elbow grease to this response to prevent the suffering of our community’s animals. It’s what TASP is trained to do and we’re up to the task.

We wish all of you reading this a safe and healthy path forward. Please be kind, be brave, be objective and be smart. We WILL get through this and we will bring our animal companions with us to a wiser, kinder world.